let's work together to

Keep 4,600 children in rural Egypt alive and healthy

ID:
5606
  • Project details
  • Our milestones
  • ...
Our goal
Decrease needless and preventable deaths of children under the age of 5 in remote areas of Egypt.
The Challenge

Diarrhea and pneumonia are major causes of death among newborns and young children worldwide.

Diarrheal diseases are the third-leading killer of children under age 5. Pneumonia is responsible for more than one in five child deaths and is the largest vaccine-preventable killer of children, according to GAVI, an international organization dedicated to improving children’s access to vaccines.

These deaths could be prevented – both diarrhea and pneumonia can be treated with low-cost antibiotics and low-tech care.

Although Egypt has made significant progress in reducing child mortality rates, pneumonia, accidents, and diarrhea are the leading causes of death among children ages 1 to 4 in the country. In some rural areas, health care is of poor quality or is too far away for families to access. Some women don’t seek care during pregnancy and childbirth or fail to follow medical advice.

Families may not have information about health, hygiene and nutrition, especially with regards to preventing pneumonia and diarrhea.

Raising $10,000 will enable Save the Children to bring direct care to 4,600 children under age 5 in poor rural villages in Egypt’s Abnoub District of the Assiut Governorate. We know that many children in the district suffer from pneumonia, diarrhea, eye and skin diseases, parasitic worms and anemia.

We will reach them though 46 mobile health caravans, whose teams of doctors and nurses will travel to rural villages to provide medical checkups and basic care. Each caravan will enable our medical team to treat approximately 100 children. The team will also educate parents and caregivers about keeping children healthy. Medicines are provided free of charge to the families who bring their children for check-ups and treatment.

Health caravans are effective because they integrate service delivery and health education. They reach remote and under-developed places. They are welcomed and accepted by the families that they serve.